Nitecore NTP40 Titanium Pencil

Nitecore NTP40

£104.95 / $119.95
8.4

My Rating

8.4/10

Pros

  • Durable
  • Corrosion-resistant
  • Sturdy clip
  • Very well-made
  • Well-balanced

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Only two 0.5mm lead refills included
  • Clip has a tendency to snag

As I have mentioned before, I am a stationery fanatic. Whenever I heard that Nitecore were bringing out a titanium pencil – the NTP40 – I just had to have it. So, without further ado, here are my thoughts on the Nitecore NTP40 Titanium Pencil!

The Unboxing

This is how the NTP40 arrives
This is how the NTP40 arrives

The NTP40 arrives in a matte black cardboard box with an image of the NTP40 in silver, along with the words “NTP40 Titanium Alloy Mechanical Pencil” in silver too. Refined and simple, the box is aesthetically pleasing, which is important, as the packaging is what people initially base their thoughts about a company on. Nestling in thick protective foam is the NTP40. The foam is important, as it protects the pencil from damage during transit. Inside the box, you receive:

 

• Nitecore NTP40 titanium pencil
• Two spare 0.5mm pencil leads

This is what you see when you open the box of the NTP40
This is what you see when you open the box of the NTP40

This pencil uses a high-quality Schmidt refill, more specifically, a Schmidt Feinminen-System DSM 2006 refill, which is (unsurprisingly) made in Germany. The 0.5mm lead is extremely smooth to write with – it’s almost ink-like in the way that it glides across a piece of paper.

First Impressions of the NTP40

A photo of the NTP40 (on the right) beside the NTP20 and NTP30
A photo of the NTP40 (on the right) beside the NTP20 and NTP30

 

Weighing only 23.9 grams, this exquisite pencil feels surprisingly robust in the hand, most likely due to the fact that the body is made from a titanium alloy called TC4, which offers high strength-to-weight ratio and excellent corrosion resistance – perfect for EDC tools. Each part of the NTP40 has been made by a CNC (computer numerical control) machine, which means that each piece will be flawless in design, with very high tolerances. This level of quality is evident when holding the pencil in your hand.

Comparing the NTP40 to Other Pencils

A close-up shot of the NTP40 titanium pencil
A close-up shot of the NTP40 titanium pencil

 

When comparing the Nitecore NTP40 to other pencils – in this case, a Staedtler HB pencil and a Bic MatiC mechanical pencil – the titanium pencil is shorter but thicker, measuring 137 millimetres in length and 9 millimetres wide. Thanks to the way that the pocket clip has been designed, it also stays securely attached to your pocket. This has been very useful, as I can’t recall the number of times I have lost pens or pencils due to a weak clip. I am very pleased with this titanium writing instrument so far.

The Cap

The crystallised tail cap of the NTP40. The photo doesn't do it justice, but I found it rather difficult to capture the detail
The crystallised cap of the NTP40. The photo doesn’t do it justice, but I found it rather difficult to capture the detail

Normally, mechanical pencils have an eraser at the top to allow you to erase anything that you write. This is not the case with this one. Instead, a fancy cap has been used which is what propels the 0.5mm lead inside the pencil. It has been coated with a crystallised substance which gives it excellent abrasion resistance. Sometimes on cheaper mechanical pencils, the lead jerks out, but this isn’t the case. The lead is propelled smoothly when the crystallised cap is pressed. This is a nice touch for an exquisite pencil.

The Clip

A photo of the pocket clip that is attached tot the NTP40
A photo of the pocket clip that is attached tot the NTP40

 

Fastened via a pair of black torx screws, a very lightweight titanium clip allows you to attach the NTP40 to your pocket. The clip is very stiff, so you don’t have to worry about losing your new pencil. It is also removable, however I plan on keeping mine attached because I would hate to lose my titanium pencil. A lot of material has been removed from the inside, which keeps the overall weight down, but don’t worry – this doesn’t make the clip any less stiff! The clip also functions as an anti-roll device, thanks to the way it has been designed.

The Barrel

A photo of the barrel of the NTP40 and the 26 anti-slide thread
A photo of the barrel of the NTP40 and the 26 anti-slide thread loops

 

The barrel of the titanium pencil features 26 loops of anti-slide threading. This allows you to write no matter the weather conditions. This also makes writing with gloves much easier, as the pencil doesn’t slip out of your hand. It is on the body that you will also find the words “Nitecore NTP40” laser etched in black. This doesn’t take away from the aesthetics of the pencil, as it is quite subtle and well-placed.

The Tip of the NTP40

A photo of the tip of the NTP40 with some of the pencil lead protruding
A photo of the tip of the NTP40 with some of the pencil lead protruding

 

The tip of the NTP40 is smooth and conical, similar to most pens and pencils. It is from here that the stainless-steel nib of the Schmidt Feinminen refill cartridge sticks out. This cartridge is by far the fanciest that I have seen. It actually screws into the tip of the NTP40 via threading. This prevents the nib from shaking or moving when writing or drawing. Very clever!

A photo of the NTP40 dismantled
A photo of the NTP40 dismantled

 

The best thing is that if and when you run out of pencil lead, simply buy more 0.5mm leads. You don’t have to replace the whole system. The crystallised cap forms a part of the internal workings of this pencil, as you can see from the photo above.

Improvements and Suggestions

A photo of the NTP30 and the NTP40 together
A photo of the NTP30 and the NTP40 together

 

To improve the NTP40, I would include a few more 0.5mm pencil leads, as it would be a nice touch considering the price of this pencil. Also, with regards to the pocket clip, I have found that it has a tendency to snag at times on clothing, which is good and bad. The pencil is less likely to come loose, fall out and get lost, which is good. However, it’s bad because it could rip finer materials such as cotton or silk. Not so much of a worry for me, as I can always be found in jeans.

There’s no denying that the NTP40 is expensive. Therefore, if Nitecore produced it in aluminium (similar to the NTP20 and NTP21), more people would be able to benefit from an extremely well-made product in a cheaper material. My only other suggestion is that it would be nice to see limited-edition versions of the NTP40, perhaps in different patterns. For example, flame-patterned titanium or engraved titanium.

Apart from that, I feel like this is a perfect pencil for the stationery fanatic who has it all. As there’s no denying the quality and craftsmanship of this EDC item, I’d say the NTP40 would be aimed at artists and architects.

Buy the Nitecore NTP40 here:

 

Read my most recent review of the OneTigris MONZTER here:

I hope you find this review useful and informative. If there is anything you think I could do to improve my reviews, do not hesitate to contact me via my email address: productreviewsbymatt@gmail.com

Review sample kindly provided by Nitecore in exchange for an unbiased, in-depth review.

Thank you for reading!

Written by Matthew Crozier

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